Advisers needed to meet investors’ performance desires

Investors are likely to need guidance from a financial adviser to balance risks with performance in post COVID-19 markets, according to Natixis Investment Managers.

The firm said its survey of Australian investors found they were seeking a 13.5% real annual return this year, only down 0.3% from expectations of 13.8% returns last year. In fact, respondents said managed to exceed expectations with returns of 14% in 2020.

This expectation of higher returns was based on the positive COVID-19 experience in Australia with over half of respondents unaffected by job loss or financial setbacks. Some 80% said they felt financially secure and 73% expected to be financially secure in retirement.

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However, interest rates and inflation were a concern and investors were worried they would affect their ability to generate an income in retirement. They were also concerned about balancing risk and investment performance.

Damon Hambly, chief executive of Australia for Natixis IM, said: “Australian investors are going to have to take on some risk if they want to achieve their double-digit returns and their more longer-term investment goals.

“It is clear that Australian investors trust their financial advisers (89%) and they will need to work with them in this recovery phase of the market to ensure their investment portfolio has the right mix of actively-managed funds to achieve the desired result.

“The challenge for many will be to ensure that investors trade on realistic expectations and rationalising those expectations with genuine tolerance for risk, overcoming their fears, and ultimately putting into practice the critical lessons they have learned around spending and avoiding emotional decisions.”




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And I'm seeking a 50% return. It ain't gonna happen people. If that is the intelligence of the average Australian investor, no wonder investment markets are so irrational.
God help our great country.

Or you can just write a book without being a financial planner with proper qualifications and even be given your own tv show.
Or you can just start your own blogg on Facebook or YouTube and its all good. Plenty of advice there.
Who needs a qualified adviser? Right?

I think I'll opt out of providing investment advice if that's the expectations. I imagine they only want 2-3% drawdown potential with that 13% upside as well.

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